1. stormingtheivory:

    change.org just sent me a petition to demand that the US name a warship after Harvey Milk and if that isn’t the most succinct example of the way queer advocacy has been coopted by neoliberalism and the military-industrial complex, bless me I don’t know what is.

    Reblogged from: redphilistine
  2. redphilistine:

    My view on Scottish independence is I am 1000% for the disintegration of the United Kingdom — and the humiliation of the English nation in particular. Maybe you won’t eat shit tomorrow, but you’ll get what you deserve eventually.

    Reblogged from: avecsabombe
  3. jesuisperdu:

jacob lawrence
    Reblogged from: ard-al-burtuqal
  4. du-style-sinon-rien:

IBEYI : The twin sisters Naomi and Lisa-Kaïndé, daughters of Cuban percussionist Anga Diaz.

    du-style-sinon-rien:

    IBEYI : The twin sisters Naomi and Lisa-Kaïndé, daughters of Cuban percussionist Anga Diaz.

    Reblogged from: numantinecitizen
  5. yaaneria:

Eritrean activists in New York protesting the U.N. initiated Ethiopian occupation of Eritrea, 1974.

    yaaneria:

    Eritrean activists in New York protesting the U.N. initiated Ethiopian occupation of Eritrea, 1974.

    Reblogged from: ard-al-burtuqal
  6. fyeaheasterneurope:

Inside the Ashkenazi synagogue in Sarajevo - the only functioning synagogue in the city.
(Souce.)

    fyeaheasterneurope:

    Inside the Ashkenazi synagogue in Sarajevo - the only functioning synagogue in the city.

    (Souce.)

    Reblogged from: poppoppopblowblowbubblegum
  7. Reblogged from: fatbodypolitics
  8. vampiricdirewolf:

Please please please stop reblogging this gif. The person that made this made this dog do this by abusing her a lot. There are videos online of him throwing across the room and hitting her.Please, this gif makes me feel so sick.

    vampiricdirewolf:

    Please please please stop reblogging this gif. The person that made this made this dog do this by abusing her a lot. There are videos online of him throwing across the room and hitting her.
    Please, this gif makes me feel so sick.

    Reblogged from: vampiricdirewolf
  9. 'Home' for many people in the margins, is, to paraphrase Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, that which we cannot not want. It stands for a safe place, where there is no need to explain oneself to outsiders; it stands for community; more problematically, it can elicit a nostalgia for a past golden age that never was, a nostalgia that elides exclusion, power relations and difference
    Dorinne Kondo (via kawrage)
    Reblogged from: zuriya
  10. xv7:

    dogwithhat:

    My brothers toothbrushes over the past month
    Why is he so angry

    does dude even still have teeth

    Reblogged from: khaledcantfly
  11. Representations of women played a crucial role in orientalizing Algeria. Over thirty years ago, Frantz Fanon noted the peculiar symbolism of the veiled Algerian woman for the French colonizer. Recent scholars have developed his insights, delineating the process by which ‘clothing becomes emblematic of a cultural or racial group,’ and more particularly how the veil came to represent Islam, thus manifesting ‘a colonial relationship which is both gendered and sexualized.’ The veiled woman was thought to be ignorant, illiterate, and oppressed, and her image functioned as a marker of Muslim cultural inferiority.
    In the most common depictions in press reports and travel writing, Algerian women were glimpsed only from afar, swathed in veils, on their way to a mosque or saint’s tomb. But another version of the trope expressed the writer’s desire to get closer, to see underneath the veil. In the male European imagination, the woman veiled in public registered at the same time her sexual availability in private, in the harem.
    Yael Simpson Fletcher, "Irresistible Seductions": Gendered Representations of Colonial Algeria around 1930 (via infinitelearning)
    Reblogged from: avecsabombe
  12. My mom went to the Fatima Jinnah park with her sister while I was rotting at home (not) studying. She’s gotten good at photography but really it ain’t about that Islamabad is beautiful.

  13. americaninfographic:

Stellar Evolution
    Reblogged from: science-junkie
  14. coffeewithajla:

    🍙🍙🍙

    Reblogged from: raqsbikun
  15. As women, when we’re children we’re taught to enter the world with big hearts. Blooming hearts. Hearts bigger than our damn fists. We are taught to forgive - constantly - as opposed to what young boys are taught: Revenge, to get ‘even.’ Our empathy is constantly made appeals to, often demanded for. If we refuse to show kindness, we are reprimanded. We are not good women if we do not crush our bones to make more space for the world, if we do not spread our entire skin over rocks for others to tread on, if we do not kill ourselves in every meaning of the word in the process of making it cozy for everyone else. It is the heat generated by the burning of our bodies with which the world keeps warm. We are taught to sacrifice so much for so little. This is the general principle all over the world.

    By the time we are young women, we are tired. Most of us are drained. Some of us enter a lock of silence because of that lethargy. Some of us lash out. When I think of that big, blooming heart we once had, it looks shriveled and worn out now. When I was teaching, I had a young student named Mariam. She was only 11 years old. Some boy pushed her around in class, called her names, broke her spirit for the day. We were sitting under a chestnut tree on a field trip and she asked me if a boy ever hurt me. I told her many did and I destroyed them one by one. I think that’s the first time she ever heard the word ‘destroyed.’ We rarely teach our girls to fight back for the right reasons.

    Take up more space as a woman. Take up more time. Take your time. You are taught to hide, censor, move about without messing up decorum for a man’s comfort. Whether it’s said or not, you’re taught balance. Forget that. Displease. Disappoint. Destroy. Be loud, be righteous, be messy. Mess up and it’s fine – you are learning to unlearn. Do not see yourself like glass. Like you could get dirty and clean. You are flesh. You are not constant. You change. Society teaches women to maintain balance and that robs us of our volatility. Our mercurial hearts. Calm and chaos. Love only when needed; preserve otherwise.

    Do not be a moth near the light; be the light itself. Do not let a man’s ocean-big ego swallow you up. Know what you want. Ask yourself first. Decide your own pace. Decide your own path. Be cruel when needed. Be gentle only when needed. Collapse and then re-construct. When someone says you are being obscene, say yes I am. When they say you are being wrong, say yes I am. When they say you are being selfish, say yes I am. Why shouldn’t I be? How do you expect a woman to stand on her two feet if you keep striking her at the ankles.

    There are multiple lessons we must teach our young girls so that they render themselves their own pillars instead of keeping male approval as the focal point of their lives. It is so important to state your feelings of inconvenience as a woman. We are instructed to tailor ourselves and our discomfort - constantly told that we are ‘whining’ and ‘nagging’ and ‘complaining too much.’ That kind of silence is horribly violent, that kind of insistence upon uniformly nodding in agreement to your own despair, and smiling emptily so no man is ever uncomfortable around us. Male-entitlement dictates a woman’s silence. If we could see the mimetic model of the erasure of a woman’s voice, it would be an incredibly bloody sight.

    On a breezy July night, my mother and I were sleeping under the open sky. Before dozing off, I told her that I think there is a special place in heaven where all wounded women bury their broken hearts and their hearts grow into trees that only give fruit to the good and poison to the bad. She smiled and said Ameen. Then she closed her eyes.

    A Woman of War by Mehreen Kasana (via pbnpineapples)
    Reblogged from: raqsbikun
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